StrandLife Science                                   Module/Unit: Human Body    Grade Level: Third Grade

 

Big Idea:  Students will discover how different tissues (bone, muscle, ligament, tendon) work together to provide movement, protection, and structure.  Students conduct a systematic investigation using direct observation, photographs, diagrams, and models to find out how different parts of the body work together and coordinate responses to tactile and visual stimuli.

 

Central Questions:

  • What are the functions of the skeletal system and the muscular system?
  • How are the movements of the human body aided and limited by bone and joint structures?
  • Use scientific thinking processes to conduct investigations and build explanations:  observing, communicating, comparing, and organizing.

 

PA Academic Standards for Science and Technology and Environment and Ecology:

3.1.4.A     Know that natural and human-made objects are made up of parts.

3.1.4.B     Know models as useful simplifications of objects or processes.

3.1.4.C     Illustrate patterns that regularly occur and reoccur in nature.

3.1.4.D     Know that scale is an important attribute of natural and human-made objects, events, and phenomena.

3.1.4.E     Recognize change in natural and physical systems.

          3.2.4.B     Describe objects in the world using the five senses.

3.2.4.C     Recognize and use the elements of scientific inquiry to solve problems.

3.3.4.A     Know the similarities and differences of living things.

3.3.4.B     Know that living things are made up of parts that have specific functions.

3.3.4.D     Identify changes in living things over time.

3.4.4.C     Observe and describe different types of force and motion.

3.6.4.A     Know that biotechnologies relate to propagating, growing, maintaining, adapting, treating and converting.

3.7.4.B     Select appropriate instruments to study materials.

3.8.4.C     Know the pros and cons of possible solutions to scientific and technological problems in society.    

4.4.4.A     Know the importance of agriculture to humans.

 

               

 


PA Assessment Anchors and Eligible Content: Earth materials

Assessment Anchor

Eligible Content

 

S4.A.1.1    Identify and explain the pros and cons of applying scientific, environmental, or technological knowledge to possible solutions to problems.

 

                 Reference:  3.2.4 C, 3.8.4 C

 

S4.A.1.1.1 Distinguish between a scientific fact and an opinion,

                   providing clear explanations that connect observations

                   and results (e.g., a scientific act can be supported through   

                   making observations).

 

S4.A.1.1.2 Identify and describe examples of common

                   technological changes past to present in the community

                   (e.g., energy production, transportation,

                   communications, agriculture, packaging materials) that

                   have either positive or negative impacts on society or

                   the environment.

 

 

S4.A.1.3 Recognize and describe change in natural or human-made

                systems and the possible effects of those changes.

 

               Reference: 3.1.4.C, 3.1.4.E

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S4.A.1.3.1 Observe and record change by using time and

                   measurement.

 

S4.A.1.3.2 Describe relative size, distance or motion.

 

S4.A.1.3.3 Observe and describe the change to objects caused by

                   heat, cold, or light.

 

S4.A.1.3.4 Explain what happens to a living organism when its food

                   supply, access to water, shelter, or space is changed (e.g.,

                   they might die, migrate, change behavior, eat something

                   else).

 

S4.A.2.1 Apply skills necessary to conduct an experiment or design

               a solution to solve a problem.

 

 

              Reference: 3.2.4.C, 3.2.4.D

 

 

S4.A.2.1.1 Generate questions about objects, organisms, or events

             that can be answered through scientific investigations.

 

S4.A.2.1.2 Design and describe an investigation (a fair test) to test

             one variable.

 

S4.A.2.1.3 Observe a natural phenomenon (e.g., weather changes,

             length of daylight/night, movement of shadows, animal

             migrations, growth of plants), record observations, and

             then make a prediction based on those observations.

 

S4.A.2.1.4 State a conclusion that is consistent with the

                   information/data.

 

 

S4.A.2.2 Identify appropriate instruments for a specific task and  

          describe the information the instrument can provide.

 

               Reference: 3.7.4.A, 3.7.4.B

 

 

 S4.A.2.2.1 Identify appropriate tools or instruments for specific

                   tasks and describe the information they can provide

                  (e.g., measuring: length-ruler, mass-balance scale,

                   volume-beaker, temperature-thermometer; making

                   observations: hand lens, binoculars, telescope).

 

S4.A.3.1  Identify systems and describe relationships among parts of a

               familiar system (e.g., digestive system, simple machines, water

               cycle).

 

              Reference:  3.1.4.A, 4.4.4.C, 4.6.4.A, 4.6.4.B,

                                   3.6.4.A, 3.6.4.B, 3.6.4.C

S4.A.3.1.1  Categorize systems as either natural or human-made

                   (e.g., ballpoint pens, simple electrical circuits, plant

                   anatomy, water cycle).

S4.A.3.1.2  Explain a relationship between the living and nonliving

                   components in a system (e.g., food web, terrarium,

                   bicycle).

 

S4.A.3.1.3  Categorize the parts of an ecosystem as either living or non-living and describe their roles in the system.

S4.A.3.1.4  Identify the parts of the food and fiber systems as they

                   relate to agricultural products from the source to the

                   consumer.

 

 

 

S4.A.3.2  Use models to illustrate simple concepts and compare the models

                 to what they represent.

 

 

                   Reference: 3.1.4.B, 4.3.4.C

 

S4.A.3.2.1  Identify what different models represent (e.g., maps show physical features, directions, distances; globes represent Earth; drawings of watersheds depict terrain; dioramas show ecosystems; concept maps show relationships of ideas).

 

S4.A.3.2.2  Use models to make observations to explain how systems work (e.g., water cycle, sun-Earth-moon system).

 

S4.A.3.2.3  Use appropriate, simple modeling tools and techniques to describe or illustrate a system (e.g., two cans and string to model a communications system, terrarium to model an ecosystem).

 

S4.A.3.3  Identify and make observations about patterns that regularly

                 occur and reoccur in nature.

 

                 Reference: 3.1.4.C, 3.2.4.B

 

 

S4.A.3.3.1  Identify and describe observable patterns (e.g., growth patterns in plants, weather, water cycle).

 

S4.A.3.3.2  Predict future conditions/events based on observable patterns (e.g., day/night, seasons, sunrise/sunset, lunar phases).

 

S4.B.1.1  Identify and describe similarities and differences between living things and their life processes.

 

 

                Reference:  3.3.4.A, 3.3.4.B, 4.3.4.A, 4.3.4.C, 4.6.4.A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S4.B.1.1.1  Identify life processes of living things (e.g., growth, digestion, respiration).

 

S4.B.1.1.2  Compare similar functions of external characteristics of organisms (e.g., anatomical characteristics: appendages, type of covering, body segments).

 

S4.B.1.1.4  Describe how different parts of a living thing work together to provide what the organism needs (e.g., parts of plants: roots, stems, leaves).

 

 

 

 

S4.B.3.2  Describe, explain, and predict change in natural or human-made systems and the possible effects of those changes on the environment.

 

Reference:  4.2.4.C, 4.3.4.C, 4.6.4.C, 3.1.4.E

 

S4.B.3.2.1  Describe what happens to a living thing when its habitat is changed.

 

S4.B.3.2.2  Describe and predict how changes in the environment (e.g., fire, pollution, flood, building dams) can affect systems.

 

S4.B.3.2.3  Explain and predict how changes in seasons affect plants, animals, or daily human life (e.g., food availability, shelter, mobility).

 

S4.B.3.3  Identify or describe human reliance on the environment at the individual or the community level.

 

Reference:  3.8.4.C

 

S4.B.3.3.1  Identify everyday human activities (e.g., driving, washing,

                    eating, industry, farming, littering) within a community that

                    depend on the natural environment.

 

S4.B.3.3.2  Describe the human dependence on the food and fiber systems

                    from production to consumption (e.g., food, clothing, shelter)

 

S4.C.1.1  Describe observable physical properties of matter.

 

Reference:   3.2.4.B

 

S4.C.1.1.1  Use physical properties [e.g., mass, shape, size, volume, color, texture, magnetic property, state (i.e., solid, liquid, and gas), conductivity (i.e., electrical and heat)] to describe matter.

 

S4.C.1.1.2  Categorize/group objects using physical characteristics.

 

 

S4.C.2.1  Recognize basic energy types and sources, or describe how energy can be changed from one form to another.

 

Reference: 3.4.4.B, 3.4.4.C

 

S4.C.2.1.2  Describe the flow of energy through an object or system (e.g.,

                    feeling radiant heat from a light bulb, eating food to get   

                    energy, using a battery to light a bulb or run a fan).

 

S4.C.2.1.3  Recognize or illustrate simple direct current series and parallel circuits composed of batteries, light bulbs (or other common loads), wire, and on/off- switches.

 

S4.C.3.1  Identify and describe different types of force and motion, or the effect of the interaction between force and motion.

 

Reference:  3.4.4.C, 3.6.4.C, 3.2.4.B

 

S4.C.3.1.2  Compare the relative movement of objects or describe                   

                    types of motion that are evident (e.g., bouncing ball,

                    moving in a straight line, back and forth, merry-go-

                    round).

 

S4.C.3.1.3  Describe the position of an object by locating it relative to another object or the background (e.g., geographic direction, left, up).

 

  

Unit Planning Guide

Strand:  Life Science                                   Module/Unit: Human Body    Grade Level: Third Grade

 

Day 1

Investigation 1:  Part 1

Counting Bones

Students observe the human body in motion and count the number of bones in the skeleton, first without visual aids, then with.

(50-min)

3.1.4.A

3.1.4.B

3.1.4.D

3.1.4.E

3.2.4.B

3.3.4.B

3.4.4.C

 

Day 2

Investigation 1:  Part 1

Counting Bones

Second Session

Short summaries of Students observe the human body in motion and count the number of bones in the skeleton, first without visual aids, then with.

(50-min.)

3.1.4.A

3.1.4.B

3.1.4.D

3.1.4.E

3.2.4.B

3.3.4.B

3.4.4.C

Day 3

Science Stories-A Marvelous Machine and The Shape of Your Shape

Skeletal body parts and their function are described in detail.  The shape of vertebrates is established by their skeletons.

(40 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.1.4.D

3.3.4.A

3.3.4.B

Day 4

Investigation 1:  Part 2

Mr. Bones Puzzle

Students assemble a model of human skeleton first from memory, and then they compare their models to each other’s and with an accurate model.

(45-50 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.1.4.B

3.1.4.D

3.2.4.B

3.3.4.B

 

Day 5

 Science Stories-The Broken Radius

Many People break a bone during their lives.  With care it can heal properly.

(30 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.6.4.A

 

Day 6

Investigation 2:  Part 1

Looking at Thumb Joints

Students investigate joints and discover the advantages of an articulated skeleton by modifying their hands to simulate having no thumbs.

(50-60 min.) 

3.1.4.A

3.1.4.B

3.1.4.E

3.2.4.B

3.2.4.C

3.3.4.B

3.4.4.C

Day 7

Science Stories-Your Amazing Opposable Thumb

The thumb is one unique human feature.  It allows humans to do many  things that no other animal is capable of doing.

(20-30 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.3.4.B

  3.4.4.C

Day 8

Investigation 2:  Part 2

Doing Joint Tasks

Students continue their investigation of joints by taping up their fingers in other ways to immobilize certain fingers or their thumbs.

(50-60 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.1.4.B

3.1.4.E

3.2.4.B

3.2.4.C

3.3.4.B

3.4.4.C

Day 9

Science Stories-Bones on the Outside

Some animals, have their skeletons on the outside of their bodies.  They are called invertebrates.  These skeletons are protective like a suite of armor.

(30 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.2.4.C

3.3.4.A

3.3.4.B

 

Day 10

Investigation 2:  Part 3

Naming Joints

Students look closely at joints in their bodies and categorize them by similarity of operation.  Compare joints to mechanical devices such as hinges and ball-and-socket connectors.

(30-40 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.1.4.B

3.2.4.B

3.3.4.B

3.4.4.C


Unit Planning Guide

Strand:  Life Science                                   Module/Unit: Human Body    Grade Level: Third Grade

Day 11

 Science Stories-Comparing Joints

The human body has different kinds of joints that produce different kinds of actions or movements.

(30 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.2.4.B

3.3.4.B

3.4.4.C

 

Day 12

Investigation 2:  Part 4

Comparing Bones

Students examine a small collection of plastic bones and discuss function as related to structure.  They determine which bones go together to form a complete leg and identify the kinds of joints involved.

(40-50 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.1.4.B

3.2.4.B

3.2.4.C

3.3.4.B

Day 13

Science Stories-Barn Owls

Once the human skeletal structure is understood, that knowledge can be transferred to the study of skeletal structures of other animals.

(20 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.1.4.C

3.3.4.A

  3.3.4.B

Day 14

Investigation 1:  Part 3

Owl Pellets

Students examine owl pellets, remove the rodent bones, compare/contrast them to human bones, and reconstruct the skeleton.

(40-50 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.1.4.C

3.1.4.D

3.2.4.B

3.3.4.A

3.4.4.C

 

Day 15

Investigation 1:  Part 3

Owl Pellets

Second Session

Students examine owl pellets, remove the rodent bones, compare/contrast them to human bones, and reconstruct the skeleton.

(40-50 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.1.4.C

3.1.4.D

3.2.4.B

3.3.4.A

3.4.4.C

 

Day 16

Investigation 3:  Part 1

Making a Leg Model

Students look and feel their muscles working while

jumping rope.  Students work in pairs to build a model leg and foot with simulated muscles and tendons that emulate the actions of a leg and foot.

(40-50 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.1.4.B

3.1.4.E

3.2.4.B

3.3.4.B

3.4.4.C

3.7.4.B

Day 17

Science Stories-Muscles and Muscles and Bonds:  Working Together

Muscles contract when they work.  They are attached to bones by tendons in a way that brings about movement.

(50 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.3.4.A

3.3.4.B

3.4.4.C

 

Day 18

Investigation 3:  Part 2

Making a Thumb Model

Students build a model to emulate the movement of the thumb, with tendons and ligaments that make the thumb operate properly.

(50-60 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.1.4.B

3.1.4.E

3.2.4.B

3.3.4.B

3.4.4.C

3.7.4.B

Day 19

Science Stories-Space Race

Knowledge of the human body and how it works is important to planning space flights.  Astronauts must prepare their bodies for conditions in space.

(40 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.8.4.C

 

Day 20

Investigation 3:  Part 3

Making an Arm Model

 

Students build an arm model with biceps muscle that flexes the arm when it contracts.

 

(40-50 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.1.4.B

3.1.4.E

3.2.4.B

3.3.4.B

3.4.4.C

3.7.4.B


Unit Planning Guide

Strand:  Life Science                                   Module/Unit: Human Body    Grade Level: Third Grade

Day 21

Science Stories-The Frozen Man

The discovery of an intact frozen human body led scientists to better understand how people long ago lived.

(50 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.3.4.A

3.3.4.D

 

 

Day 22

Investigation 4:  Part 1

Stimulus/Response

Students investigate the time that elapses between visual stimulus and a response.  They then compare foot-response time to hand-response time.

 

(50-60 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.2.4.B

3.2.4.C

 

Day 23

Investigation 4:  Part 2

Response and Practice

Students investigate how practice affects response time.  They repeat the Part 1 investigations after several sessions of practice.

(30-40 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.2.4.B

3.2.4.C

 

Day 24

Science Stories-Smart Training

Humans can improve control of the muscular/skeletal system of their bodies by thoughtful practice.

(30 min.)

3.1.4.E

4.4.4.A

Day 25

Investigation 4:  Part 3

Timing Your Responses

Students quantify response time in 100ths of a second.  They catch a falling strip of paper on which are written numbers that correspond to the time elapsed between drop and catch.

(40-50 min.)

3.2.4.B

3.2.4.C

3.3.4.B

3.7.4.B

Day 26

Science Stories-The Circulatory System

Other systems besides the muscular/skeletal system, such as the circulatory system, operate in our bodies.

(30 min.)

3.1.4.A

3.3.4.A

3.3.4.B

 

 

Day 27

Choosing Your Own Investigation

Students select a topic from their study of bones, joints, muscles, and stimulus/response to investigate in greater depth.  The results of their project are shared with the rest of the class in a formal presentation.

(4-6 sessions)

3.1.4.A

3.2.4.B

3.2.4.C

3.3.4.B

 

 

 

 


Strand:  Life Science                                   Module/Unit: Human Body    Grade Level: Third Grade

                                                                    Investigation 1:  Part 1-3

Content and Process

(State Standard)

What do you want to know, do, be like?

What do you want students to know, do, be like?

Unit Activities

What kinds of learning experience will you use to help students to:  know, do, be like?

 

Resources

What instructional resources could be used?

(*Required, +Materials Forthcoming)

Assessments

How will you know if benchmarks have been achieved?

 

  • A human body can move in many ways.  Movements are aided and limited by bone and joint structures. 

        3.1.4.A, 3.1.4.E, 3.2.4.B,

        3.3.4.B, 3.4.4.C, 3.6.4.A

 

  • A skeleton is a system of bones.

3.1.4.A, 3.3.4.B, 3.4.4.C

 

  • Bones have a variety of forms. 

        3.1.4.A, 3.1.4.D, 3.2.4.B,  

        3.4.4.C,

       

 

  • There are similarities between human bones and bones of other mammals.

3.1.4.C, 3.2.4.B, 3.3.4.A

 

  • Bones have three major functions in the human body:  support, protections, and locomotion. 

      3.1.4.A, 3.1.4.D, 3.2.4.B,

      3.3.4.B, 3.4.4.C,   

     

  • Students observe the human body in motion, focusing on the bones.  They discuss what moves during rope jumping.
  • Students count the number of bones in the human skeleton with out and then with visual aids.
  • Students first assemble a human skeleton from memory, then compare and discuss their models.
  • Students compare their model to a picture of an accurate model.
  • Students examine owl pellets, remove the rodent bones from then, and compare and contrast their structures to those of human bones.
  • The students will reconstruct the rodent skeleton.

* Foss Science Stories

* Foss Teacher guide

* Foss Teacher preparation 

   Video

 

Language Extensions

Make a bone-facts class book.

Play bone-name games

Read about other skeletons.

Sing about bones

 

Math extensions

Problem of the week

 

Science Extensions

Make a bone museum.

Look at X rays.

 

Art Extension

Create action figures

 

Foss website

www.fossweb.com

 

Home/school connection

Foss Newsletter

  • Response Sheet – Bones
  • Teacher Observation of bone comparisons
  • Owl-Pellet Observation sheet
  •  

 


Strand:  Life Science                                   Module/Unit: Human Body    Grade Level: Third Grade

                                                                    Investigation 2:  Part 1-3

Content and Process

(State Standard)

What do you want to know, do, be like?

What do you want students to know, do, be like?

Unit Activities

What kinds of learning experience will you use to help students to:  know, do, be like?

 

Resources

What instructional resources could be used?

(*Required, +Materials Forthcoming)

Assessments

How will you know if benchmarks have been achieved?

 

  • The human body has an articulated skeleton ready for action.

     3.1.4.A

 

  • The structure of a bone is related to its function.

3.1.4.A, 3.2.4.B, 3.3.4.B, 3.4.4.C

 

  • Articulated means jointed or joined in sections.

3.1.4.A, 3.1.4.B, 3.2.4.B

 

  • Articulated hands with opposable thumbs are essential for performing intricate tasks.

3.1.4.A, 3.1.4.B, 3.1.4.E, 3.2.4.B, 3.2.4.C, 3.4.4.C

 

  • The human skeleton has three types of joints:  hinge, ball-and-socket, and gliding joints.  Each allowing the body to move in many different ways.

     3.1.4.A, 3.1.4.E, 3.2.4.B,

     3.3.4.B, 3.4.4.C

  • Students investigate joints and discover the advantages of an articulated skeleton. 
  • They modify their hands to simulate having no thumbs and try to accomplish  a number of routine tasks.
  • Students tape up their fingers in other ways to immobilize certain fingers or their thumbs.
  • Students look closely at joints in their bodies and categorize them by similarity of operation such as mechanical devices like hinges and ball-and-socket connectors.
  • Students examine a small collection of plastic bones and discuss function as related to structure.  They determine which bones go together to form a complete leg and identify the kinds of joints involved.

* Foss Science Stories

* Foss Teacher guide

* Foss Teacher preparation 

   Video

 

Language Extensions

Research joint disease.

Increase disability awareness.

Write a book about a girl with arms in casts.

Research artificial joints and limbs.

Collect photos of bodies in motion.

 

Math extensions

Problem of the week

 

Physical Education Extension

Play Twister with a focus on joints.

 

Science Extensions

Immobilize knees and elbows.

Compare dolls and other movable toys.

Compare animal movement and joints.

Research articulated machines.

 

Foss website

www.fossweb.com

 

Home/school connection

Foss Newsletter

  • Teacher Observation, identifying joints in finger and thumb
  • Response Sheet – Joints
  • Teacher Observation, bone assembly
  • Student Sheet-Bone Observation

 

 

Strand:  Life Science                                   Module/Unit: Human Body    Grade Level: Third Grade

                                                                    Investigation 3:  Part 1-3

Content and Process

(State Standard)

What do you want to know, do, be like?

What do you want students to know, do, be like?

Unit Activities

What kinds of learning experience will you use to help students to:  know, do, be like?

 

Resources

What instructional resources could be used?

(*Required, +Materials Forthcoming)

Assessments

How will you know if benchmarks have been achieved?

 

  • The main function of muscles is to provide movement.

     3.1.4.A, 3.1.4.E, 3.2.4.B,

     3.3.4.B, 3.4.4.C

 

  • Muscle tissue contracts when it works.

     3.1.4.B, 3.1.4.E, 3.2.4.C,

     3.3.4.A, 3.3.4.B

 

  • Muscles attach across joints to move bones.

3.1.4.A, 3.2.4.C, 3.3.4.B

 

  • Muscles provide coordination and structure for the body.

     3.1.4.A, 3.1.4.B, 3.3.4.A,

     3.3.4.B, 3.4.4.C, 3.7.4.B

 

  • Muscles attach to bones with tissues called tendons.

      3.1.4.A, 3.1.4.B, 3.2.4.C,

     3.3.4.B 

 

  • Ligaments attach bone to bone.  Some ligaments serve as guides through which tendons run.

      3.1.4.A, 3.1.4.E, 3.2.4.C,

      3.3.4.B.

 

 

  • Students look and feel their muscles when the muscles are working during the rope jumping. 
  • Students work in pairs to build a model leg and foot with simulated muscles and tendons that emulate the actions of a leg and foot during jumping.
  • Students build a second model to emulate the movement of the thumb, with tendons and ligaments that make the thumb operate properly.
  • Students build an arm model with biceps muscle that flexes the arm when it contracts.

 

* Foss Science Stories

* Foss Teacher guide

* Foss Teacher preparation 

   Video

 

Language Extensions

Discuss jumping muscles.

Identify muscle bridges.

Describe aches and pains.

Research muscles in space.

 

Math extensions

Problem of the week

 

Physical Education Extension

Research injuries.

Research cramps.

 

Science Extensions

Look closely at a chicken wing.

Add extensor muscles to the models.

Keep an exercise journal.

 

Foss website

www.fossweb.com

 

Home/school connection

Foss Newsletter

  • Teacher Observation, muscle basics
  • Response Sheet-Muscles
  • Teacher Observation of muscle basics
  • Student Sheet-Muscle Action

Strand:  Life Science                                   Module/Unit: Human Body    Grade Level: Third Grade

                                                                    Investigation 3:  Part 1-3

Content and Process

(State Standard)

What do you want to know, do, be like?

What do you want students to know, do, be like?

Unit Activities

What kinds of learning experience will you use to help students to:  know, do, be like?

 

Resources

What instructional resources could be used?

(*Required, +Materials Forthcoming)

Assessments

How will you know if benchmarks have been achieved?

 

  • Identify changes in living things over time.

3.3.4.D

 

  • Know the pros and cons of possible solutions to scientific and technological problems in society

       3.8.4.C

 

 

 

 


Strand:  Life Science                                   Module/Unit: Human Body    Grade Level: Third Grade

                                                                    Investigation 4:  Part 1-4

Content and Process

(State Standard)

What do you want to know, do, be like?

What do you want students to know, do, be like?

Unit Activities

What kinds of learning experience will you use to help students to:  know, do, be like?

 

Resources

What instructional resources could be used?

(*Required, +Materials Forthcoming)

Assessments

How will you know if benchmarks have been achieved?

 

  • The action of bones, muscles, and central nervous system working together is called coordination.

3.1.4.A, 3.3.4.A, 3.3.4.B

 

  • A stimulus is an event that triggers a response.  It is often information received through the senses.

3.2.4.B, 3.2.4.C, 3.3.4.A, 3.3.4.B

 

  • A response is a reaction to a stimulus.

3.3.4.B

 

  • Response time is the length of time between a stimulus and a response.

3.2.4.C

 

  • Practice increases muscle strength and reinforces neural pathways.

3.2.4.B, 3.2.4.C, 3.3.4.B, 3.7.4.B

 

  • Know the importance of agriculture to humans.

         4.4.4.A

  • Students use a falling-cup device to investigate the time that elapses between a visual stimulus and a response.  They attempt to move their hand out of the way of a falling cup once they see it start to fall. 
  • Students compare foot-response time to hand-response time.
  • Students investigate how practice affects response time.  They repeat the Part 1 investigations after several sessions of practice.
  • Students quantify response time in 100ths of a second.  Students catch a falling strip of paper on which are written numbers that correspond to the time elapsed between drop and catch.
  • Students select a topic from their study of bones, joints, muscles, and stimulus/response to investigate in greater depth. 
  • The results of their project are shared with the rest of the class in a formal presentation.

* Foss Science Stories

* Foss Teacher guide

* Foss Teacher preparation 

   Video

 

Language Extensions

Write a stimulus/response story.

Write captions for pictures.

 

Math extensions

Problem of the week.

Compare graphs.

 

Science/Physical Education Extension

Investigate other stimuli.

Practice jumping rope.

Practice coordination activities.

 

Foss website

www.fossweb.com

 

Home/school connection

Foss Newsletter

  • Response Sheet-Coordination
  • Student Sheet-Project Proposal
  • Teacher Observation, Independent Investigating and Research
  • Teacher Observation, Presentation
  • End of Module Assessment